“In Restless Dreams I Walked Alone”

It is a dark and lonely place, sat in front of the keyboard, ready to write, knowing not how one’s words will be read, whether they will be read at all, but hoping, maybe, to reach at least one person who also walks alone.

That’s me. I want to share with you something I don’t easily talk about. Something that keeps me restless. Something of which I am ashamed.

Drove the night toward my home
The place that I was born, on the lakeside
As daylight broke, I saw the earth
The trees had burned down to the ground

It was twenty years ago that I stopped drinking. There have been drinks since then, too many, but I finally stopped for good about five years ago when I accepted that one drink was never going to be enough. And no matter how much I drank I would never succeed in what was driving those drinks. I needed to no longer be me.

To cut a long story short, declared an alcholic I turned straight to another addiction. Smoking. Actually it was endorsed by my doctor. And I kept adding addictions as I sought to no longer be me.

I stopped trying to kill myself (to be honest, I’m not sure why) about the time I stopped drinking, but while I might have looked better to anyone looking, I was battling myself so hard that I needed a vice.

I’m not going to tell you what my vices have been. No one knows and it would detract from the point of this post. You see the point is that no one knows. You think you know me well enough to know? You’re wrong. It has all been hidden. From everyone.

Paint yourself a picture
Of what you wish you looked like
Maybe then they just might
Feel an ounce of your pain

Years ago, when I was battling severe depression, my mother used to tell me that I had to tell people how I was because they had a right to know. A sideline is that what she meant was they had a right to know because they were praying for me. That was actually one of the biggest points that put me off Christianity, but like I said, that’s a sideline for another day.

What happened instead, was that I withdrew. Pulled down the covers and hid. If they didn’t know then they couldn’t hurt me by their judgments, their meaningless comments and their complete inability to ‘get it’. Because let’s face it, who does ‘get it’ …unless they’ve been there themselves?

And more important to this post is who gets addiction? Who understands what can drive an addict to destroy themselves trying to achieve some nameless and often unknown goal?

I need(ed) to not be me. I need(ed) to distract myself from what I’m feeling.From the pain within. Maybe even destroy that pain, or just feel better… for a while (in reality, maybe a second).

It’s hard to take courage
In a world full of people
You can lose sight of it all
And the darkness inside you
Can make you feel so small

It might seem boring, but the only visible sign of addiction now is my smoking, everything else is truly hidden (but still destructive). Even my smoking, I do alone. I’ve given up telling anyone when I try to give up, because there have been so many attempts. Too many. And now I’m not just ashamed of the need for nicotine, but also of my inability to give it up.

The thing is though, that there are two sides to me. Always. One side wants to give up. That side needs to give up because aside from my health, cigarettes are really expensive in New Zealand and there are other things I could be spending my money on.

But then there is the side of me that wants to smoke. Yes, really. She’s still there, and I know that it is her that stalls the ability to stop. She likes smoking. She likes it when people cast judgment her way. She laughs when her neighbour coughs as she passes. The New Zealand Government wants to do away with smoking by 2025, and she is determined to still be smoking past then. Just because. Because she can.

She wants to stop herself from feeling, stop herself from being …her. She knows there are healthier approaches to life, but she also knows that she can change to a ‘healthier’ addiction but that any addiction can (and will) become unhealthy. She’s stuck on a treadmill. No matter what it is, she will take it to the extreme. Just another addiction. Just another attempt to stop herself from being her.

In this proud land we grew up strong
We were wanted all along
I was taught to fight, taught to win
I never thought I could fail
No fight left or so it seems
I am a man whose dreams have all deserted
I’ve changed my name, I’ve changed my face
But no one wants you when you lose
I never thought this would be me. You don’t even know the worst, but if you’d looked at me 30 years ago, you never would have thought it would be me either.
The short answer is that perhaps this is what trauma does to you. Trauma that keeps repeating, and keeps having you fight not to be you anymore. Because if you can do that, then maybe the trauma will end.
They don’t see the angel
Living in her heart

The good news is, there is an angel living in my heart. Actually, that angel is probably what nearly everybody sees. Because either they’re not looking, they see only what they want to see, or I don’t want them to see. Shame drives it all.

That angel wants to conquer her demons addictions. But it’s hard when shame pulls the curtains. Recently I metaphorically fell on a programme available in my area to help my angel conquer those addictions. All I have to do is go, at the appointed time. Tuesday at 6pm.

That’s not hard, is it? But it is. Three Tuesdays at 6pm have passed since I found the programme and I can’t get myself there. I can’t get there because I’m scared. The anxiety is enormous. There are too many “what if’s” and “yes, but’s”. Every Tuesday (so far) I choose to not go (because I know it is a choice) and choose to stay with my addictions. There is a fierce battle going on inside of me. I need the help but I just can’t quite do it. Yet.

So don’t be afraid to let them show
Your true colors
True colors are beautiful
Like a rainbow
Quotation Credits
‘The Sound of Silence’ by Simon & Garfunkel
‘Don’t Give Up’ by Peter Gabriel
‘True Colors’ Cyndi Lauper (Songwriters Billy Steinberg/Tom Kelly)
‘Skin’ by SiXx AM
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Becoming Mindful

I admit to being a reluctant participant. While I understood the principle of mindfulness, I had no desire to make it part of my life. I know, I’m not meant to say that. But I have.

Maybe it was the fact that it was recommended to me by so many people in so many places. It would help my depression. It would help with anxiety. It would definitely help my Borderline Personality traits and would help my dissociative disorder. On and on have been the recommendations. Apparently it would help with almost any disorder. Don’t get me started on how mindfulness was meant to help with chronic pain. The only thing was that if someone recommended something to help me, I was more than likely to do the opposite.

It’s not that I didn’t want help. I just pushed away the help that came my way. There have been too many recommendations from all types of quarters from my (ex) mother-in-law to the best of psychotherapists, psychiatrists and pain specialists. Most things recommended actually didn’t work. Some have actually caused me more harm rather than good. I just didn’t want to know anymore.

So any time someone mentioned mindfulness or a programme including aspects of mindfulness I just gave a non-committal answer and quietly backed away. I didn’t want to know. That was until recently.

Before I go on, it’s important to clarify just what I’m talking about when I say mindfulness. So here’s a definition from my fav Oxford Dictionary:

“A mental state achieved by focusing one’s awareness on the present moment, while calmly acknowledging and accepting one’s feelings, thoughts, and bodily sensations, used as a therapeutic technique.”

I got thinking one day about what is a daily activity for me. It’s one that you might be surprised I am linking to being mindful. Most days I spend time with my mother in the secure Dementia Care facility when she has lived for the past 15 months. Not only do I spend time with my mother but also the twenty-odd other residents and the staff. They have all become a bit like family to me.

It occurred to me that when I go through the locked doors, I leave everything behind me and focus on what is happening at that moment. I can’t focus on any of my stuff. That gets left at the door because Mum needs my complete attention. She is also not well enough to be able to give attention to my stuff. It’s not exactly mindful meditation, but it is focusing on the moment.

Then today I was reading a blog by a woman with early-onset dementia. She said:

Once you’ve got your head around the diagnosis, don’t dwell on the losses or the future as you have no control over each. Instead enjoy this moment as there are still many adventures and laughter to be had”

She made me think that aside from finding a mindful approach the only way to cope with visiting my mother, it was also an approach for those facing diagnosis of illness. It’s far from an easy illness, or an easy place to visit, let alone be there day after day. But there are fun moments. There are adventures to be had. I leave my troubles at the door and venture forth into Mum’s reality. That is all that matters for the time I am there.

While those thoughts have been gradually forming in the background of my mind, I almost literally stumbled a few months ago onto a more conventional form of mindfulness through meditation. I was truly desperate to quiet the tinnitus in my head one night. Having bought a new phone I had lost the app that I used to use a night for nature sounds.

Instead, I came across the app Calm which offers mindfulness meditation. I was listening to it before my rebellious mind had a chance to say no. What’s more, I found the sleep story I listened to, was quietening my mind, focusing on one thing. Now.

For as long as I remember, I have had trouble with over-thinking while I am supposed to be going to sleep. It has been like an automatic switch that pings me into thinking and worrying about everything. As a sufferer of anxiety and Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) I didn’t have a hope of getting to sleep until I finally collapse in exhaustion. Using sleep stories to focus my attention, I am getting to sleep much quicker and not becoming anxious about the whole night time and sleep thing.

Having found mindfulness useful in sleep I have started using meditations offered by Calm. Yes, really. Me. I admit I have been amazed at how calm I can be after meditating and how it helps me throughout the day.

But I am slow to change my daily routine to make sure I build into each day some time for meditation. I also still find myself amazed to even be going here. Me? Mindfulness? I would have said never. Not for any really solid reasons but simply because I had got a thing in my head and simply wasn’t going to go there.

Well, now I am.

I finish with a rather long quote, but one that I wish I had read, and had the willingness to take on board, many years ago:

“I’m simply saying that there is a way to be sane. I’m saying that you can get rid of all this insanity created by the past in you. Just by being a simple witness of your thought processes. 

It is simply sitting silently, witnessing the thoughts, passing before you. Just witnessing, not interfering not even judging, because the moment you judge you have lost the pure witness. The moment you say “this is good, this is bad,” you have already jumped onto the thought process. 

It takes a little time to create a gap between the witness and the mind. Once the gap is there, you are in for a great surprise, that you are not the mind, that you are the witness, a watcher. 

And this process of watching is the very alchemy of real religion. Because as you become more and more deeply rooted in witnessing, thoughts start disappearing. You are, but the mind is utterly empty.

That’s the moment of enlightenment. That is the moment that you become for the first time an unconditioned, sane, really free human being.” 

― Osho

Thanks for reading!

 

Cate

“He Gives Me The Creeps”

Even before I have started, this post runs the risk of being full of generalisations. I hope you will excuse this. I really don’t mean it to be this way but it’s just where my thoughts are at today. I know a good number of very good men, so don’t get me wrong. I am not, nor will I ever be a ‘man-hater’. Actually, there are many times when I prefer the company of men over women.

So many good women have dealt with the wrong man and so many good men have dealt with the wrong woman that, by the time you two finally meet, you’re BOTH afraid of each other… so afraid, you run the risk of ending it before you’ve even given it a chance.” 
 – Unknown

I wasn’t able to establish a definitive author for this statement. More than one voice seemed to claim it as their own words and I admit I have eventually given up searching in order to focus my efforts on what it is that I want to say. Please forgive me for this, and let me know if you know for sure, who is the author. Meanwhile, the words are sadly, perhaps the story of my life.

Am I a good woman? I don’t know and I wouldn’t dare to say. I’m sure there are more than a few who would say I am not. What I do know is that I have come across the wrong man too many times in my life. More than just the wrong man, but the true determination of a wrong man (in my eyes) as a ‘creepy man’ and usually sometimes dangerous man. Certainly dangerous to me. Sometimes dangerous to me physically, but even more so, emotionally and mentally dangerous.

It is the point at which I label a man as “giving me the creeps” that I know that I am at a turning point. The best thing to do would be to run like hell, but I admit there have been times when I have been fully immersed in a relationship when I finally conclude he “gives me the creeps”. Then running like hell is still the best course of options (for me), but can be easier said than done.

Yesterday I came home and muttered to anyone who would listen:

“…(he) Gives Me The Creeps”

It was not about anyone I am in a relationship with, not the least reason being that I have previously concluded that a relationship is the last thing on this earth that I want to be in.  Yes, too many ‘wrong men’ have set me on this course, but more so, and completely outside the scope of this post, I have simply decided that a relationship of any sort, with man or woman, is not what I want for my life.

This particular man maybe not be relationship material (for want of a better phrase) but still can stand as a threat to my personal safety and wellbeing.

When anyone who would listen to my mutterings hears me say “he gives me the creeps” they know that this is a turning point for me. I can hear my own gut instinct speaking (finally) and take it as a fair warning, a threat to my wellbeing, particularly my emotional wellbeing and I should run like hell. That would be the logical thing to do. Many times it is exactly what I have done regarding both creepy men and women. But there is another option. It may not be the most sensible option but it is often what comes to mind first.

My experience of ‘wrong men’ (sadly more than one) has left me carrying the burden of Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). The summary of this you will find recorded in many posts on my last blog Infinite Sadness… or hope? so I won’t go into detail here. As healthy (and recovered) as I usually like to see myself, there are still triggers to my feeling of being unsafe. They can come up in all kinds of environments, but they often eventually carry the statement “he gives me the creeps”.

When those words come from my lips I immediately want need to hunker down in my own version of a safe house/bunker. I want need to shut all the doors and windows, pull the curtains, unplug the (landline) telephone and go off-line. Before those words are uttered my gut instinct has not kicked in. I have perhaps been oblivious, maybe naive. I have wanted to be friends with anyone… until now when I am reminded that there are more than just one creep in this world (sad but true).

The events in my life that lead to the PTSD were across a long period of time. I came to know that “safe house/bunker” existence as normal. Yes, that’s right, I did say normal. I was constantly afraid. In terms of relationships, I feared that every man was a ‘wrong man’ and would eventually turn into a ‘bad man’ who could would hurt me. I couldn’t trust anyone. I had determined that my gut instinct could not be trusted and that every situation was one in which I could be would be in danger.

I’m not quite so afraid nowadays (after a whole lot of therapy and time), but that feeling that ‘a person who gives me the creeps’ is the first step to me feeling I am in danger. And it can come for any number of indicators, sometimes just even a hunch.

Of course, I know the reality to be that I am not always in danger when I determine someone to be ‘a creep’ but it’s still a turning point in how I regard a person. I admit that when I came home muttering this about someone I encountered again yesterday, I knew I needed to be careful around him.

Yes, careful in the sense of keeping myself safe but also careful in the sense of not going overboard in barricading my life. The difficulty is in getting the right balance and recovery from PTSD never taught me how to get that balance. I guess balance is something that comes with time and experience. Meanwhile, I realise I am not as recovered from PTSD as I thought, but rather I live and fight it every day. Oh, and yes, the barricades are up!

One last note, if you’re reading this and “think this song is about you”, (yes, I’m borrowing the lyrics) please don’t. This song post is not about you.

“Alone with thoughts of what should have long been forgotten, I let myself be carried away into the silent screams of delirium.”
― Amanda Steele, The Cliff

Thanks for reading

 

Cate

 

 

Me & Carol – Part Two

TTrigger Warning:
This post contains subject matter that is difficult to read. It includes discussion of suicide including suicidal ideation, a suicide pact and suicide baiting.

This post is Part Two of my last post (Me & Carol – Part One). I recommend that you read that earlier post before reading this one.

As one of my favourite writer’s wrote:

“…in a world I’d never known among people whose existence I never thought possible,
became for me a concentrated course in the horrors of insanity and the dwelling-place
of those judged insane, separating me forever from the former acceptable realities and assurances of everyday life.”
 – Janet Frame, An Angel At My Table

It was Friday, when Carol had been discharged but I was still an inpatient at the local psychiatric hospital where we had got to know each other. Back then, 20 years ago, while mobile phones were common, it was certainly not everyone that owned one. I didn’t have one so relied on being able to use the patient telephone to make contact with anyone outside of the hospital.

Carol and I spoke by phone that day and she told me that she wanted to go ahead with our earlier plans (our suicide pact) to die the next day, but as I wasn’t able to be with her that she would do it alone.

It is fair to say that I totally understood her desire to die. I wanted to die too. While I’m not sure that I outright encouraged her to go ahead with the plan, I am certain that I didn’t discourage her. At the end of our conversation, she told me she was turning off her phone and that we would not speak again. I guess that we ended by saying goodbye, but I don’t remember that aspect.

What I do remember is the terrible dilemma I sat with for the next 24 hours. Would I tell someone or not? Would I get help to stop her planned suicide attempt?

The short story is that I didn’t tell anyone, and that is something I will always have to live with.

Saturday came and went, and I continued to be torn apart by what I knew, and what I imagined was happening, eventually coming to the conclusion that my friend was by now dead. I heard nothing.

It was three days later when my then-husband Dave arrived to visit that night, armed with a letter that had come in the mail. It wasn’t something I was expecting. On opening it I found that it was a ‘suicide note’ from Carol. It was hard to disguise my distress from Dave, but essential because he knew nothing, as did anyone else.

It was some days further on before I got a phone call. It was Carol, and she was in ICU. She had survived but had sustained serious damage to her heart which she would carry for the rest of her life. I admit that I was struck by a terrible dichotomy of feelings. Relieved she was alive but disappointed that she hadn’t achieved her goal. You see, I could understand her despair and desire to end her life. Our hopelessness was something we each carried, but also shared together. In my sickness, I really wanted for her pain and suffering to be over. I was disappointed for her.

In the months that followed, Carol and I went separate ways. It wasn’t something that we wanted, it’s just what happened as a result of unrelated circumstances. I shifted to another city, and after eventually ending my marriage, did not return to Wellington. We eventually lost contact and today, I have no idea where Carol is. I have looked for her on social media with no luck.

♦♦♦

Now I am setting out into the unknown. It will take me a long while to work through the grief. There are no shortcuts; it has to be gone through.
– Madeleine L’Engle

Of course, this was not over when Carol and I parted company. There was a lot for me (and presumably her) to process and work through. What I had done, in agreeing to this pact and then ‘allowing’ Carol to go ahead with the plan, was monumental. We were no longer together but I carried guilt with me from that time on. As my recovery from mental illness began, I found myself carrying more and more guilt. I began to understand the implications of what I had done. And now that we had no way of contacting each other, there was no way of working through it.

I think that it’s fair to say that friendships between people with severe mental illnesses can become pretty intense, pretty quickly. It is an emotional rollercoaster that while on that journey we gather those around us into. My experience is that particularly when you are in a group therapy environment, that rollercoaster gets bigger and faster. In group therapy, you are often sharing intimate parts of your life with other participants. You get to know each other well. But it’s an artificial environment, controlled to some extent by the therapist. At some point, it comes to an end, and in my experience, you can expect the friendships to last forever, but that often doesn’t happen. Outside of that controlled environment (for Carol and I it was the hospital), there can actually be nothing to tie you together.

In my years of mental health treatment, I can think of a number of my friendships that have been intense but actually didn’t last once outside of the therapuetic environment. I think this is what happened for me and Carol.

You may rightly wonder why I am sharing the journey I went on with Carol. Why would I even admit this stuff? Good question. I am opening myself up to all kinds of abuse.

A few months back, was the story of Michelle Carter and Conrad Roy, where Michelle (by text messages) encouraged her boyfriend Conrad, to kill himself. Michelle got 15 months prison time for her encouraging texts. At the time, the court announced it’s decision, there was a lot of fierce and hateful comments on social media towards Michelle. I hung my head while the antagonism towards Michelle Carter was in the news because I felt if people only knew, they would target me with abuse too.

What was so different in that case from what I did to Carol? It seemed the only substantial difference I could see was that Carol survived her suicide attempt. Conrad didn’t. While it was reported that both Conrad and Michelle were depressed at the time of his suicide, I suspect too that the mental illness Carol and I were both experiencing was more severe. But no excuse.

I can’t justify anything I did (and didn’t do). It is actually hard for me to imagine doing what I did, but then I am not as severely ill as I was, so perhaps I can claim to be a different person. But some people do bad things when they are severely mentally ill. Many of them end up in prison, forensic psychiatric care, or with severe consequences for what they do. Many have to live with the burden of what they did.

While thinking out loud (that’s what I do on my blog) I am struck that the biggest hurdle is perhaps to forgive oneself for what has been done while mentally ill. I think that is where I am at now. I realise that I need to forgive myself for having let Carol down. I wasn’t a good friend to her because I was so caught up in my own hopelessness that I couldn’t find hope (or help) for her.

I can’t have this conversation with Carol. I don’t even know whether she is dead or alive. But I have to find a way to forgive myself so that I can live on.

*Names have been changed to protect privacy

Thanks for reading

 

Cate

Me & Carol – Part One

TTrigger Warning:
This post contains subject matter that is difficult to read. It includes discussion of suicidal ideation, suicide and a suicide pact.

Twenty years ago, I had a year that can best be described as hell. 1997, I was living in Wellington, New Zealand with my (then) husband Dave. I had already (privately) decided that my marriage was doomed, but 1997 saw things spiral down for Dave and me. It took me until mid-1998 (and six months of intensive residential therapy) before I actually left Dave but 1997 was tough, admittedly on both of us.

But it was the year I met Carol, and for that reason, it was a very good year. Weird really, such bad and good together.

Carol was one light in a very dark period. I met her near the beginning of the year when we were both patients at a local psychiatric hospital. We were both being re-admitted pretty much as soon as we were discharged. It was a policy issue, but that’s another story. I was admitted over twenty times that year. I wasn’t being discharged because I was well or even off the crisis list. I was being discharged because they needed the bed for someone else and, so they said, they didn’t want me to become institutionalised. I think it was a little late for that. As I’m sure you can imagine, I spent most of the year there. Carol, who had Bipolar Disorder, was in a similar traffic jam and we very quickly became very close friends.

Carol Bear, given to me by Carol. On the right arm is a friendship bracelet she gave me.

Dave didn’t like our friendship. He was pretty conservative (putting it nicely because this story isn’t about him) and he objected to the friendship Carol and I had primarily because she was a lesbian and because she smoked (I hadn’t started smoking by then nor was she the catalyst to me starting). Actually, Dave wouldn’t ‘allow’ Carol in our house (at times when we were both discharged) for these reasons. I don’t know what he expected might happen if she did come to our home but I was furious and just didn’t tell him when she had been there. What he didn’t know…

I was going through a time of rebellion from my life. I had seen myself as a “nice Christian” and didn’t want to be that person anymore. That rebellion was perhaps part of the reason I had so many hospital admissions that year. As awful as hospital life was, I can now admit that in some ways it was great. I was away from my “nice Christian” marriage and with some like-minded people. I didn’t have to worry about anything, because someone else (usually a nurse) would worry for me. I had no responsibilities and the worst I might get is a night in isolation, but only if there was a bed available.

That said, I was terribly depressed and anorexic. I was recovering from Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) and while I hadn’t been yet diagnosed with Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) I was very clearly showing symptoms. My psychiatrist had already declared that they simply didn’t have any staff equipped with the skills to help me. I was literally said to be beyond help. Perhaps a culmination of all these psychiatric issues was chronic suicidal ideation. At that point, I had thought about and acted on suicidal thinking constantly for about three years, including my biggest suicide attempt in 1996.

The next part of the story is difficult to tell, but I feel like I need to tell it. I didn’t even accurately tell what happened when I published my book, Infinite Sadness in 2009. I was ashamed and I feared reaction. Would what I had done be the final straw, particular for my family? Would they turn their backs on me?

Carol was also chronically suicidal, and while both in the hospital we eventually formed a pact to die by suicide together. It was planned for a specific date and our goal was to both be discharged so that we could carry out our plans. We would say whatever was needed to achieve discharge.

Carol managed to convince staff that she was ‘safe’ for discharge but I didn’t. I was kept in hospital. I was really angry, perhaps mostly with myself.

“I was bruised and battered, I couldn’t tell what I felt.
I was unrecognizable to myself.
Saw my reflection in a window and didn’t know my own face.
Oh brother are you gonna leave me wastin’ away
On the streets of Philadelphia.”
– Bruce Springsteen

This is a good place to stop this story because actually, this post is not so much about the story. I will continue the story in a later post but what is important to me is how the heck did I end up part of a suicide pact?

I was “unrecognizable to myself”. I was “unrecognizable” to my friends and family. They didn’t mean to leave me “wasting away” but they didn’t know how to help me. Even the health professionals didn’t know how to help. I can’t imagine what they all would have thought if they had known about our suicide pact. Well, now the truth is out and a song just won’t be enough.

Had you told me five years earlier that this is where I would be, I would never have believed you. It just wasn’t possible that I would slide so far down to consider not only my own death but also supporting my friend’s eventual suicide. But that’s what mental illness does. Not for everyone, but when you go down as far as I went down, anything is possible at the same time as nothing seems possible. There was no hope (in both my mind and apparently in that of the experts), and because of that I was prepared to consider both Carol’s and my own death. A completely foreign thought to the Cate I had been five years earlier.

I saw this meme this morning. I found it interesting:

http://www.facebook.com/depressionyouandme/

That’s not who I was. I didn’t know I would be ok, I didn’t understand that people still loved me. I had already been told they couldn’t help me, just keep me safe! And I didn’t hope to be well anymore. I just wanted an end. I wanted an end for myself (and for Carol). Yet I was described as being depressed. I had depression.

My point is that depression looks different for different people. I hope that people who are depressed today can say each of the statements in that meme above. But it’s not where I was, and I need you to understand that I was a long way from that point when I considered our suicides.

To be part of another’s suicide plans is not right. I know that. And there are no “Buts…’

I had crossed a line. But whether I was aware of that or not, I can not tell you. I don’t remember the feelings attached to that time.

If you are to have any understanding of what I was doing, know this: I was severely and chronically mentally ill, and my thoughts were far distorted from whom I had previously been. This decision Carol and I made to die together was so badly distorted that perhaps there is no way for outsiders to understand. There are no other explanations. It just was, for both of us. It was perhaps a very clear ‘mark in the sand’ of hopelessness.

When we look at mental illness from the outside it is almost impossible to fully understand. I suggest the meme above offers a ‘nice’ image of depression and one easy for ‘outsiders’ to accept. For many, that will be how it is, but it’s not at all where I was at.

I was wrong to do what I did, but I really had little understanding of right and wrong at that time. Perhaps that is one of the reasons I had no hope.

They say “love changes everything”. I say:

“mental illness changes everything”

It’s not an excuse for what I agreed to with Carol. Her life was worth more than that. So was mine. But it happened because we were both suffering from severe mental illness. You can have no idea how you would act in similar circumstances. So please, choose not to judge us.

Part Two of Carol and my story will continue in a future post. It’s too much to contain in one post. Certainly too much for me, and maybe too much for you. I don’t promise that it will be my next post, but it will be soon so please follow so that you can be sure to read it.

  • Names have been changed to allow for privacy.

Thanks for reading

 

Cate